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Judas Priest -- "You've Got Another Thing Comin'"

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (4+ / 0-)

    Editor, Daily Kos Elections

    by James L on Fri Dec 21, 2012 at 09:32:53 PM PST

  •  Interesting that despite total control (4+ / 0-)

    of the legislature, Oregon Senate Democrats gave a committee chairmanship to Republican Brian Boquist, who'll chair the Veterans & Emergency Preparedness committee in the senate.

    ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

    by James Allen on Fri Dec 21, 2012 at 09:57:55 PM PST

  •  Just want to share some good news in my life. (24+ / 0-)

    I got a GPA of 3.68 this semester, which shows that all the worrying I did was pretty unnecessary.

  •  I don't normally take the question literally... (5+ / 0-)

    But MA-Sen and HI-01 are where I'm focused right now. Unless Mark Sanford is the nominee in SC-01, we won't win that seat, and 2014 predictions are a bit silly when this fiscal cliff business hasn't even been resolved yet.

    Keeper of the DKE glossary. Priceless: worth a lot; not for sale.

    by SaoMagnifico on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 12:22:12 AM PST

  •  MN to push for marriage equality (8+ / 0-)

    Living in Kyoto-06 (Japan), voting in RI-01, went to college in IL-01.

    by sapelcovits on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 05:02:55 AM PST

    •  I was a real naysayer on MN (5+ / 0-)

      But we didn't win by the blank ballot technicality. We won outright.

      I hope the legislature does this. Early and quickly is absolutely the right way.

      Ok, so I read the polls.

      by andgarden on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 05:44:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I think civil unions will pass (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Zack from the SFV, MichaelNY

        But I don't see marriage having the votes, specifically in the senate, but maybe not in the house either.

        •  Additionally (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          KingTag, tietack, Bharat, politicalmetrics

          Democrats CAN'T be seen as overreaching and putting pet projects ahead of the business if the State, as that is what caused Republicans to lose in 2012. If we want to keep control, we need to be seen as effective stewarts of the State, and not power-hungry politicians that put special interests ahead of, say, the budget (again, Republicans circa 2011).

          •  Gay couples are not special interests (6+ / 0-)

            or pet projects. They are one 10th of this nation who want their families to have the same rights as everyone else. "It might upset bigots" is not a reason to deny someone basic rights. If the votes aren't there, then I guess we can't do it, but the fact that they're trying this suggests that isn't necessarily a forgone conclusion.

            •  I think Goldy described the situation inartfully (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              James Allen, MichaelNY, Audrid

              The question is whether Ds in MN would put their majority at risk in '14 by going for full marriage equality in this session.

              I suggest that we're at the start of an 'up' economic cycle, and Ds in MN will be fine in '14, even if there's political blowback from trying for marriage equality.

              But that's just a very wild guess.

              I hope; therefore, I can live.

              by tietack on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:11:16 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yeah, but of we do it in early 2013 (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                James Allen, MichaelNY, askew

                Other issues will have moved to the fore by then.

                And yes, I get that there are a fair number of Dems in socially conservative districts, but these are also mostly Democratic districts.

                •  and in 2 years the state and those districts (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  tietack, MichaelNY

                  will most likely be more in favor of marriage equality than they are now.

                  ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

                  by James Allen on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:23:29 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

              •  This makes no sense (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                bythesea, andgarden

                There was a public vote against banning gay marriage just now.  That's a public green light for the state legislature to vote to legalize gay marriage.  There's no public blowback awaiting no matter what else happens the next 2 years.

                They might not actually do it, but they're behind their own voters in that case, which says something very unflattering about them as Democrats.

                44, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

                by DCCyclone on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 07:08:18 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  Alas, gay couples aren't 1/10. (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              tietack, MichaelNY, andgarden

              Depends on what you ask, but I think self-identified gays and lesbians are about 3-4% of the U.S. (and iirc there are more self-identified bisexuals than gays or lesbians, but I don't think you get to 10% either way).  The Williams Institute at UCLA works on this; see here (with, yes, Gallup). I think I also looked myself at OKCupid users, with similar results, although that was a while ago and I don't quite remember.

              27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

              by Xenocrypt on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 09:43:27 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Interesting report (3+ / 0-)
                Younger Americans (age 18-29) are more than three times as likely as seniors aged 65 and older to identify as LGBT (6.4% v. 1.9%, respectively).  Among those aged 30 to 64, LGBT identity declines with age — at 3.2% for 30- to 49-year-olds and 2.6% for 50- to 64-year-olds.
                How many older self-identified "straight" people really aren't?

                I hope; therefore, I can live.

                by tietack on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 09:47:14 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Depends what your definition (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  tietack, MichaelNY, Zack from the SFV

                  of "really aren't" is, I suspect.

                  27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

                  by Xenocrypt on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 09:54:25 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                •  OkCupid noted that (5+ / 0-)

                  a large proportion of their self-identified bisexual users don't look at both male and female profiles (and this also varied with age--younger users tended to say they were bi and only look at opposite sex profiles, older users tended to say they were bi and only look at same-sex profiles).  

                  That doesn't mean they don't date both men and women, and even it they didn't, that wouldn't mean they weren't "really" bisexual, but it does illustrate how tricky these things are to define.  And for political purposes, I suspect self-identification is the important question, but I'm not sure.

                  27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

                  by Xenocrypt on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:00:47 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  That explains it (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    MichaelNY

                    If I'm reading you correctly, while it's the LGBT community today, for people over 50, it's the LG.. community; aka, older bisexuals self-identify as "straight".

                    (Is "hetero" a more neutral adjectival noun?)

                    I hope; therefore, I can live.

                    by tietack on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:16:12 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Not quite. (3+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      James Allen, tietack, MichaelNY

                      The OKCupid report suggests that (for example) an older male user who calls himself bisexual will often only look at male users, and the fame for an older female user.  (Though I don't think they broke it down by gender.)  This might suggest that some older users who identify as bisexual feel a stigma about identifying as gay or lesbian.

                      Conversely, a younger male user who calls himself bisexual will often only look at female users.  (Although, again, it might not hold for both genders.)  Perhaps some young people identify as bisexual as a sign of open-mindedness, rather than an immediate interest in dating both sexes.  Since the Gallup data combined all of the LGBT population, this isn't directly relevant.  

                      27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

                      by Xenocrypt on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:31:11 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                •  Also note that the Gallup figure (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  tietack, James Allen, MichaelNY

                  includes all self-identified LGBT people--so self-identified gays and lesbians per se are some subset of the LGBT 3.4% of the total sample.

                  27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

                  by Xenocrypt on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:12:23 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

              •  Damn (0+ / 0-)

                You beat me...

                23 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

                by wwmiv on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 11:58:36 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  One interesting thing is that (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              James Allen, MichaelNY

              self-identified gay and lesbian politicians are disproportionately successful relative to self-identified bisexual politicians and the apparent self-identified numbers in the population (there's Sinema and Brown, so this might be changing, but even so).  I've wondered if bisexual politicians have a harder time tapping into identity-based fundraising and political networks, or if they can face skepticism among LGBT voters and activists, like that guy who ran against Babette Josephs in 2010.  

              27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

              by Xenocrypt on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 09:52:01 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  2/100th pure gay (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MichaelNY

              4/100ths at most when including bisexual individuals:

              http://www.gallup.com/...

              http://abcnews.go.com/...

              23 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

              by wwmiv on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 11:58:07 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  Look, I'm as big of a LGBT supporter as youll find (9+ / 0-)

              I have 5 brothers and sisters, none of whom are straight. So to suggest that I am coddling bigots is wildly offensive, but I will give you a pass on this one because you have no idea who I am or where I am coming from. From an political standpoint, the narrow Amendment 1 victory is hardly political capital enough to be seen as a mandate to pass SSM in Minnesota. I think the momentum is in the right direction, and we need to tread carefully lest we damage the progress we are making. Remember, there are Democrats in the house/senate that are in districts that voted 2-1 FOR the amendment, and they would be DOA at the ballot box in their districts if this kind of legislation is pushed through right now, and there are enough of these Democrats such that it would destroy our majorities, as the lead isn't THAT big for us at the moment.

              Like it or not, the best way to do this is to get the affairs of the state done immediately, pass a good budget, be seen as a good governance majority early in 2013. At the end of the legislative session, pass Civil Unions or something more palatable to the more conservative factions of the state, which would be cover for some of the DFLers in unfriendly districts, while making progress on the issue. Most of the business of the state is done in odd-numbered years, like the biannual budget, , etc. Come 2014, depending on the state of the economy, the popularity of the legislature and governor, and the fact that 2 years of having civil unions will add to the increased support for it we are seeing across the country and across the state, and THEN there will likely be political capital enough to either pass an amendment and put it before voters, where it would stand a very good chance to pass.

              These kinds of causes are actually hampered by the most fervent supporters, as they swing for the fences instead of playing small ball. Bunt for a single, steal second, sac fly into 3rd, and score on a bunt.  We're standing on first base right now, the key is to get to second, and not get caught trying to steal home.

              •  That's the other view we needed to hear (5+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                OGGoldy, MichaelNY, Audrid, R30A, DCCyclone

                most specifically

                Remember, there are Democrats in the house/senate that are in districts that voted 2-1 FOR the amendment, and they would be DOA at the ballot box in their districts if this kind of legislation is pushed through right now, and there are enough of these Democrats such that it would destroy our majorities, as the lead isn't THAT big for us at the moment.
                And you should not have needed to defend your bona fides.

                I hope; therefore, I can live.

                by tietack on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 12:41:48 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I know I shouldn't have to (5+ / 0-)

                  But any time I say anything that resembles reticence here, I am attacked relentlessly in comments and PMs. I really do miss SSP

                  •  Then I should remember to speak up (5+ / 0-)

                    when your bona fides on this issue are questioned.

                    (I miss SSP too, but we're here, and making this work involves more "having" each other's back.)

                    I hope; therefore, I can live.

                    by tietack on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 02:31:17 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  That's terrible. (3+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    MichaelNY, tietack, SaoMagnifico

                    I didn't know the environment could get so hostile.

                  •  For the record, I didn't intend anything (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    MichaelNY

                    As a personal attack on you. I just fundamentally disagree with your legislative strategy.

                    •  I do think you were being harsh (3+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      MichaelNY, Audrid, SaoMagnifico

                      You included the following statement in your response to OGGoldy

                      "It might upset bigots" is not a reason to deny someone basic rights.
                      While I think Goldy was inarticulate, he never suggested that "It might upset bigots".

                      I hope that you understand Goldy's background better now, and hope that you were not part of the treatment that he has encountered by PM.

                      I hope; therefore, I can live.

                      by tietack on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:50:56 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  I more or less stand by that statement (3+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        MichaelNY, andgarden, askew

                        Although it may have come off as emotionally charged, and I agree that if the votes aren't there, the votes aren't there. However, generally, in states where there's no direct initiative process, the best way to enact a policy is usually:

                        1. Elect legislative majorities from a party that generally favors that party.
                        2. Twist the necessary arms to make it happen and enact the policy.

                        While again, he's no bigot Goldy is more or less saying when he talks about avoiding the issue due to potential backlash is that we should be so afraid of the power of homophobes at the ballot box (despite them losing at the ballot box) that we shouldn't do the right thing by Minnesota's thousands of gay couples.

                        The backlash isn't always all it's cracked up to be. Hell, we held the Iowa Senate in 2010 of all years. But sometimes, you have to be willing to take risks for what you believe in. Well LBJ pushed through the civil rights act, he knew he was losing the south for Democratic candidates for decades. But you know what? He made a real improvement in the lives of millions of African Americans, which made it the right thing to do.

                        •  I suggest that you read about how gay marriage won (3+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          MichaelNY, OGGoldy, skibum59

                          in WA/ME/MD, ref http://www.theatlantic.com/...

                          I note this bit

                          "The basic message that supporters of traditional marriage are bigots, guilty of discrimination, had never worked in focus groups. For liberal whites like Feinstein to lecture black Californians about discrimination was not a winning message."
                          I suggest that you went further than Feinstein did on prop 8, lecturing someone (OGGoldy) whose family is deeply affected by the issue, as if he were bigoted against his brothers and sisters.

                          I further note that LBJ (not LeBron James, ref the latest version of those initials) had a supermajority in Congress during the time you reference.

                          I conclude by suggesting that your approach is the way that Gay Marriage lost at the ballot box in the years before 2012.

                          I hope; therefore, I can live.

                          by tietack on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 09:11:11 AM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  As with our conversation on racism in the south. (5+ / 0-)

                            You are not making a distinction between analysis (which is what DKE is about) and public argumentation.

                            -I never called Goldy a bigot and don't think he is one. I simply called for a more aggressive strategy than Goldy wants to embrace.
                            -The relevant factor is that with the necessary arm twisting, LBJ had the votes to pass his policy. I'm not saying we should have a vote if the votes aren't there, but if it's at all possible to twist enough arms to get them there, we should not be afraid of doing the right thing because of what might happen to us at the ballot box, especially considering the way public opinion is trending on this issue.
                            -Finally, while again, I'm talking about analysis, not argumentation, we don't need to win this at the ballot box in Minnesota. We need to win in the legislature, and then govern responsibly, passing a budget that makes the right choices. Even if we do lose the legislature over this, which I view as pretty unlikely, the first time it could come up for a public vote again would be 2016, by which point it almost certainly won't be a winning issue for the other side.

                          •  Your statements, I think, crossed the line into (2+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            MichaelNY, OGGoldy

                            argumentation, and into personal innuendo.

                            To repeat, your response to OGGoldy included:

                            "It might upset bigots" is not a reason to deny someone basic rights.

                            I hope; therefore, I can live.

                            by tietack on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 11:16:38 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  only if you read more into that than (3+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            MichaelNY, andgarden, HoosierD42

                            it says.

                            ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

                            by James Allen on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 11:26:36 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  I think you're misunderstanding (2+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            MichaelNY, sapelcovits

                            He didn't call OGGoldy a bigot.  He was only caricaturing OGGoldy's strategy.  That's not a personal attack.

                            20, CA-18 (home), CA-13 (school)
                            politicohen.com
                            Socially libertarian, moderate on foreign policy, immigration, and crime, liberal on everything else.
                            UC Berkeley; I think I'm in the conservative half of this city. -.5.38, -3.23

                            by jncca on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 11:55:11 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  LBJ had a supermajority of Democrats (0+ / 0-)

                            but had to depend on the support of many Republicans, including Minority Leader Everett Dirksen, because at that time, 67 - count 'em, 67 - votes were required to break a filibuster.

                            Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

                            by MichaelNY on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 12:43:45 PM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  LBJ (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            MichaelNY

                            LBJ had a lot of conservative democrats.  

                            the "conservative coalition" is a ghost of the 20th century.

                  •  What? (4+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    MichaelNY, Audrid, OGGoldy, James Allen

                    Tell whomever is sending you negative PMs to f off. And if anyone of the DKE crowd is doing that, I basically say the same. I'm assuming most of those people are FPers?

                    23 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

                    by wwmiv on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 12:12:20 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

              •  I agree (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                tietack, MichaelNY

                but only because we know that Republicans in districts that voted against gay marriage will never help us out, and won't pay a price for it at the ballot box.

                23 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

                by wwmiv on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 12:45:17 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I am all about fairness (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  tietack, MichaelNY

                  And I give credit where credit is due. Republican Representative John Kreisel unknowingly provided the material for the last advertisement that really cinched the Amendment's defeat. Had this ad not been cut, I am convinced it would have passed. Kriesel is one of the Republicans that truly scares me as a Republican prospect down the road.
                  http://www.youtube.com/...

                  And Also in fairness, there are zero Republicans in districts that voted against the amendment as there are Democrats in districts that voted against it. The lowest "yes" vote for a Republican was Andrea Kieffer, and her district still voted 43% yes, and she hung on by only single-digits, and her support for the amendment in 2011 was tepid at best. SO really what you're saying is completely wrong, as Republicans who supported it ALREADY paid at the ballot box. It isn't like Republicans got a free pass in their next election like you are implying, most all of the ones in marginal seats were wiped out.

              •  I get that there are D legislators (0+ / 0-)

                in areas that voted for the amendment. I really do. But as I understand it, a lot of these areas still voted for Obama. I don't get how a legislator supporting marriage would be DoA in an area that voted for a president supporting marriage equality, and I think this is important to enough people's lives to be worth taking a risk.

                Also, could you source your assertion that there are no Republicans in districts that voted no on the amendment? I find it implausible that there are lots of Democratic districts that went 2-1 for the amendment but no Republican districts that voted against it, considering it failed. I find it hard to believe that there weren't at least one or two suburban Republican districts which voted no.

                •  I worded the "no Republicans" thing oddly (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  MichaelNY, BeloitDem

                  What I meant to say "There are no Republicans in districts that voted against the amendment as strongly as there are Democrats in districts that voted for it" And here is the results link. You can cross-reference results by legislative district and legislative districts
                  http://electionresults.sos.state.mn.us/...

                  Also, Obama lost most all of the Democratically held districts that voted for the amendment. Off the top of my head I can think of a few DFL Senator-Romney-strongly ProAmendment districts: Skoe, Koenen, Stumpft. And That's just the senate, off the top of my head, and at least 60% pro-amendment.

                  But really, most of the areas that had Republican representation that were won by obama and against amendment 1, now have DFL representation at the legislative level. This is probably close to 90% of such districts, at minimum. I am dead serious when I say Republicans already paid at the ballot box for this.

                  •  Didn't your congressional district (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    MichaelNY

                    vote for Obama and Amendment 1?

                    That would suggest that there are some legislative districts that voted that way as well.

                    •  My home district did (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      MichaelNY

                      Which is the 8th. And yes it did vote for Amendment 1, and for Obama. And there are Democrats there, lots of them. These are not the ones I am referring to directly, however, as the areas of the 8th that voted for the amendment that have DFL representation did so narrowly. Majority Leader Bakk's district voted for the amendment, for instance.

              •  Civil Unions Won't Mean Shit To Anybody (0+ / 0-)

                if the Supreme Court overturns DOMA, which I think it will.

                It will get a lot harder to go the disgraceful route of a civil union in the future.

                Civil unions are already hated and are meaningless. Look at how few people have requested them in Rhode Island, for instance.

              •  That's fair and a much clearer explanation (0+ / 0-)

                Thanks.

                44, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

                by DCCyclone on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 07:09:39 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  That is silly (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            LordMike, BeloitDem, andgarden, HoosierD42

            The public voted against banning gay marriage.  That's pre-approval to legalize it outright.  There's no overreach in the legislature acting on that.  Nothing the state legislative Republicans did the past two years was preceded by any such public vote on the specific issue.

            I don't question you on the likely vote count based on your knowledge of state politics, but the argument that follows doesn't wash.

            44, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

            by DCCyclone on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 07:05:35 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  Also, the voter ID prop (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LordMike, OGGoldy, MichaelNY

        Democrats everywhere should take notes on what the campaign did right in opposing it.

        Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

        by KingofSpades on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:58:48 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  MA Sen: Teddy Jr. might run (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    James Allen, tietack, MichaelNY, DCCyclone

    Don't know how I feel about this one.  I've always been a big Kennedy person, except for Ms. Townsend, but this has high reward, high risk, written all over it.

    Friends of Ted Kennedy Jr., the late Senator Edward M. Kennedy's son, confirm he’s seriously considering a run for the U.S. Senate seat that would become available if Sen. John F. Kerry becomes the next Secretary of State.

    “He’s giving it serious thought,” said a source close to the family. “He’s received lots of phone calls from unions and political people up and down the east coast who think he should run. They’re telling him that he would be a formidable candidate. I’d say there’s a 50-50 chance he’ll run ”

    Kennedy, 51, is co-founder and president of the Marwood Group, a New York-based healthcare consulting and financial services firm. He owns a home in Connecticut and former President John F. Kennedy’s house in Hyannisport on Cape Cod.

    http://www.bizjournals.com/...

    Let all the Bush tax cuts expire

    by Paleo on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 06:43:51 AM PST

    •  What's the history of "carpetbaggers" into MA (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      Would that even be an issue for Teddy, Jr -- especially if the R opponent is Bill Weld?

      I hope; therefore, I can live.

      by tietack on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:15:33 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I don't like it. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SaoMagnifico, MichaelNY

      I mean he could have ran against Murphy in the Ct primary - where he lives - if he wanted to run for the Senate.  

      At least it's not Teddy's Seat, as Warren won that.  Because Scott Brown landed a good sound bite when he correctly claimed that the 2009 special election seat wasn't for "Ted Kennedy's seat but the people of Massachusett's seat".  

      This would be seen as a gimmick.  

      The NRA is the Gun Manufacturer Lobby. Nothing more. Their pontification about the second amendment is nothing more than their ad jingle. They're the domestic version of the Military Industrial Complex.

      by Jacoby Jonze on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:32:52 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  If he lived in MA, I think he would make (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      a good candidate.

      But I think the carpetbagging would be a major issue.  

    •  He lives in Connecticut (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jncca, MichaelNY

      I really don't like the idea of someone carpetbagging into a state to run with their only real credential being their family name.

      Keeper of the DKE glossary. Priceless: worth a lot; not for sale.

      by SaoMagnifico on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 12:16:15 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  So you despise Hillary Clinton? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HoosierD42

        They had no connection to New York at all except as occasional tourists.

        I'm surprised people are saying carpetbagging would be a problem.  He's Ted Kennedy, Jr.  Carpetbagging will not be a problem, no one will care.  I have no idea if he'd win a primary or how good a candidate he'd be or what kind of campaign he'd run.  But national Democrats are recruiting him and national Democrats are pretty smart, do a good job of recruitment...especially on the Senate side, where I can't think off the top of my head of a bad top recruit in a long time.

        44, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

        by DCCyclone on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 07:17:25 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Better than any of the mentioned candidates (0+ / 0-)

      and miles better than any of the congresscritters.

      Mr. Gorbachev, establish an Electoral College!

      by tommypaine on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 12:39:06 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  "miles better" (4+ / 0-)

        ... than candidates who already have millions of dollars in the bank? Yeah, he's a Kennedy, but he'd also be a carpetbagger who's fundraising and personality are question marks. Lets not rush to conclusions.

        (-9.38, -7.49), Blood type "O", social anarchist, KY-01, "When smashing monuments, save the pedestals. They always come in handy." — Stanisław Lem

        by Setsuna Mudo on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 01:33:38 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  It's not a "rush" to say people 18% behind (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY

          in polling and approval ratings are "miles" worse than Kennedy.

          The congresscritters are close to DOA.  Yes, campaigns matter, but being well known, having shitty approvals, and being over 15% behind in (dubiously reliable) polling is a rottant place to start.

          Mr. Gorbachev, establish an Electoral College!

          by tommypaine on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 02:27:07 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  "dead on arrival"? (8+ / 0-)

            Faves for those congressmen in that same WBUR/MassINC poll:
            Markey +12
            Capuano +12
            Lynch +12

            Here's the real problem; name recognition for those same congressmen:
            Markey 36%
            Capuano 34%
            Lynch 36%
            ... and, name recognition for Scott Brown:
            99%

            So there is a question of if they'll be able to become as well known as Brown, on the short timetable of the special election. And yeah, Kennedy's name is a great substitute for name recognition at this point, but it's amazing what a couple million dollars in advertisement can do for your name recognition.

            Your argument (which is actually just that Brown's residual goodwill gives him a lead when no one knows who his opponent is) is a great argument for not nominating that one St. Sen. from Berkshire. But it's not a great argument against one of the serious candidates who will have the money to introduce themselves to voters.

            For the record, Brown led Warren by 15 to 17 points at first, when no one was paying attention and no one knew who she was, as well.

            Like I said, if Kennedy starts a bit better off, it's because his famous name works as a substitute for actual name recognition. But saying he's "miles better" and that the other candidates are "dead on arrival" seems completely ridiculous on the face of it.

            It'll be a close race with any of the potential candidates and Brown when people learn who they are, and I think there's a strong argument to go for a candidate who is a known strong fundraiser with a stable personality -- like one of the congressman -- instead of this total unknown who we know nothing about except that he happens to be related to a famous Senator.

            (-9.38, -7.49), Blood type "O", social anarchist, KY-01, "When smashing monuments, save the pedestals. They always come in handy." — Stanisław Lem

            by Setsuna Mudo on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 03:21:00 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  PPP from June 7, 2011 (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MichaelNY

              Favorables:
              Capuano -1
              Markey +6
              (Warren +4)
              Brown +12 approvals
              The congresspeople had about 40% unknown.  Warren had about 60% unknown.

              PPP final 2012 poll
              Brown +16 approvals
              (Warren +7 favorable)

              It's a pretty safe assumption Brown's favorables are at least the normal three or so points above approvals that we see with someone like Obama.  In fact, his favorables are probably much higher than his approvals.

              The chances that Kennedy starts off anything other than "miles" better than a Congressmember with negative approvals are pretty much none.  And by "miles better", I mean "chance to win", not "could lose by 5 points instead of 7 points".

              Mr. Gorbachev, establish an Electoral College!

              by tommypaine on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 05:42:26 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  Warren was behind (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY, KingofSpades, DCCyclone

            in trial heats (and significantly IIRC) before she entered the race.

    •  If its gonna be a Kennedy (0+ / 0-)

      it should be Vicki.

  •  Interesting that You Have a Judas Priest Video (6+ / 0-)

    The recent attempts of the gun industry (NRA, most GOP, some Democrats) throwing up red herrings and blaming mass shootings on everything else besides our insane gun laws (24 hour news, movies, video games, etc) reminds me of when government officials (like Lieberman) blamed heavy metal music for teenager's committing suicide.

    These people think that people should be able to own assault weapons with 100 round drums but shouldn't be able to own video games.

    Genius!

  •  The race I'm looking forward to is (0+ / 0-)

    the race for the final episode of Hellsing Ultimate (OVA series) to come out!  It comes out on the 26th and the trailer is kickass:

    Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

    by KingofSpades on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:58:09 AM PST

  •  Hillary Clinton might campaign for (6+ / 0-)

    Dem nominee for Senate in MA.

    This POLITICO article notes that the president, first lady, and Bill Clinton will all aid whoever the Dem nominee ends up being.

    They also mention Hillary Clinton, as someone who could  get involved, since she would no longer be SOS.

    I noted a few weeks back, that it would be interesting to see how quickly Hillary jumped back into the political fray. The key race I thought was VA Governor. VA has become a swing state, thus it would be a key 2016 state, and the Clintons' good friend Terry McAuliffe is the likely Dem nominee. Bill will no doubt be on the trail for McAuliffe, but I wonder if Hillary might, especially if she was looking at 2016.

    But it looks her return to the campaign trail might start in MA.

    •  I think she'll stay out of it. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BennyToothpick, MichaelNY, GloFish

      If she's planning on running in 2016 she needs to stay off the GOP and MSM radar as long as possible.  Jumping into partisan politics right away will give the GOP and MSM an excuse to start blasting away at her.  If she contends she's retired and stays away from politics - any attacks against her would seem out of line for the most part.  

      She should take two years off completely removed from the partisan political realm - start a spin off to the Clinton Foundation that would deal with empowering women into the electoral process worldwid - both as candidates and as voters.  

      I could see her getting involved in the McAuliffe campaign, but she could explain that away as he's a personal friend.  Even then I think Bill campaigning would be enough.  The GOP believes she's going to run and they're itching to put her on blast - does she want to face that for the next four years?  Stay below the radar politically and they'd largely have to hold fire.  

      Look at me, giving political advice to the Clinton's. Ha!

      The NRA is the Gun Manufacturer Lobby. Nothing more. Their pontification about the second amendment is nothing more than their ad jingle. They're the domestic version of the Military Industrial Complex.

      by Jacoby Jonze on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 01:02:31 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  The counter argument to that (8+ / 0-)

        If she did want to run for president, the GOP will start criticizing her at some point, and she would have to respond.

        As talented and smart as she is, she hasnt been a candidate in while. So an initial response might be a bit slow, rusty and flat footed.  If such a moment came sometime in 2016, right after she had reemerged from the nonpolitical world, that could be bad for her campaign.

        If she is going to run for president in 2016, better to ease her way back into that world by supporting McAuliffe, the Dem nominee for Senate in MA, and maybe some other candidates in the 2014, kind of as a way to acclimate herself back into the world of partisan politics and prepare for her own presidential run.

    •  It would work. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jj32

      She's rather popular there and would help out.

      Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

      by KingofSpades on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 05:22:22 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  James thanks for the Samurai Champloo suggestion (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    James Allen, KingofSpades

    I watched all 26 episodes this past week on netflix and it was quite enjoyable.  I still prefer Cowboy Bebop since the anachronisms can be somewhat jarring and the sci-fi theme seemed more natural.  I did love how towards the beginning Jin and Mugen seemed one dude short of a Rush band with their attitudes.  I do have to say though that the animation looks fantastic in 720p, I bet Cowboy Bebop would look really good if it ever came out in bluray.

    NC-06/NC-04; -9.12, -8.62; Yellow Dog Democrat

    by sawolf on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 12:32:35 PM PST

    •  It's a rather picaresque anime. (0+ / 0-)

      A ronin, a rogue, and a samurai's daughter on a journey of revelation and self-discovery across Japan during the tail end of the feudal era and decline of the age of samurais and shoguns.

      Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

      by KingofSpades on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 05:21:16 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I liked the episode where they meet a (0+ / 0-)

        Dutchman who is trying to run away from the other trade representatives from the Netherlands to live as a citizen in Edo.

        Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

        by KingofSpades on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 05:32:45 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Obama got 36% in Vernon, CA in 2008 (7+ / 0-)

    This year, he got 48%. That probably qualifies as one of the more unusual swings of the year, but seeing as there are just under 40 votes cast there every cycle, the percentages are prone to odd swings, since one vote can make everything shift wildly.

    26, Male, CA-24 (new CA-26), DK Elections Black Caucus Chair.

    by DrPhillips on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 02:20:52 PM PST

  •  IL-Gov 2014 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    James Allen, Zack from the SFV

    Some weeks ago I was defending L Madigan should run for the senate in 2016, but after see M Obama doing very well in the polls, I changed my mind.

    Now I would support a bid of L Madigan for Governor in 2014. And a bid of M Obama for the Senate in 2016.

    •  Malia is too young ;) (5+ / 0-)

      ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

      by James Allen on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 03:03:33 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Michelle can do more good outside politics... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      Especially being treated as the junior senator from Illinois by Republican and some Dem Sen jackasses.  

      The NRA is the Gun Manufacturer Lobby. Nothing more. Their pontification about the second amendment is nothing more than their ad jingle. They're the domestic version of the Military Industrial Complex.

      by Jacoby Jonze on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 03:44:50 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I think Madigan does run for governor in 2014 (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, abgin

      unless Durbin were to retire. Then she might run for that seat. She was interested in the Senate seat in 2010, but obviously declined.

    •  Gov or Senate? (0+ / 0-)

      I definitely see Madigan running for Governor in 2014 if Quinn retires. She's very popular in IL and has been quietly building her reputation with both the people and the political powerplayers for 12 years as AG, so I'm sure she's poised to run in '14.

      If Madigan runs in 2014 for Governor, Bill Daley would probably be sidelined, since I don't think he'd want to force a primary on a popular AG like Madigan. This isn't a bad thing, since I've never been found of Daley, who seems a bit too friendly with big business.

      The wildcard is if Durbin retires in 2014. If that happens, I still see Madigan running for Governor (she'd be more fit as an executive than as a legislator) and Bill Daley running for Senate. Who are some other Dems who could run for Senate in 2014? Maybe Tammy Duckworth (although she'd still be pretty new in Congress), Pat Quinn (if he chooses not to run for re-election), Alexi Giannoulias (he only lost by a couple percentage points in 2010) or a congressman (Mike Quigley maybe?). For the GOP side, I see Pete Roskam running for Gov or Senate. He's supposedly a "rising star" in the GOP, and probably wants a promotion.

      Student, Proud Progressive, Science Nerd, and Skeptic. Born and raised in CT-03.

      by betelgeux on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 08:14:11 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Roskam would be a fool to run though (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        James Allen, MichaelNY, jncca

        If Quinn weren't likely to retire or get primaried then he might have a shot, but why give up a safe house seat to get demolished by Madigan?  Even against another Democrat he'd have a very tough time, this is just a tough state for the GOP to win.  Unfortunately we'd have no shot at picking up his house seat either and he is probably their best candidate to run, but I just don't see him doing that.

        I think we'll end up seeing a state legislator being their nominee.  All of Roskam, Shock, and Kinzinger have the "rising star" aura around them, but realistically how much higher can they go?  I think all of them will realize they have safe seats for life more or less and they'd rather accrue seniority in the house than gamble on a likely loss in a relatively hostile state.

        NC-06/NC-04; -9.12, -8.62; Yellow Dog Democrat

        by sawolf on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 08:26:40 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Saw "The Hobbit" today in IMAX (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    itskevin, Audrid, BeloitDem

    (at the Tuttleman Imax theater in the Franklin Institute)
    It was good, action-packed, and relatively loyal to the source.  It's not as good as LOTR, but that's because it's padded and doesn't have the sense of urgency and impending doom that the LOTR had.  What I liked about it is how they changed it from the book, ironically.  The Hobbit was J.R.R. Tolkien's first original full-length book.  It was published in 1937, a full 18 years before he fully published the LOTR trilogy.  He didn't initially intend to write a saga and when he wrote the Hobbit, he obviously wasn't anywhere close to developing a unique universe complete with a history, mythos, and dimensions of complexity.  One thing I liked about the movie adaptation of the Hobbit is it took the source material and reimagined as if Tolkien had the whole legendarium in his mind when he wrote it (which he didn't).  It expands on the threat of the Necromancer, an entity mentioned only in passing in the book, for one thing.

    Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

    by KingofSpades on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 05:54:08 PM PST

    •  I just saw it and liked it too (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades, BeloitDem

      I thought it struggled at points to balance the kiddy tone of Tolkien's original book with the darker, epic tone of the Jacksonized Lord of the Rings legendarium, as you put it -- the Great Goblin scene, the mountain trolls, and the storm giants come to mind -- but overall, I think it was well done, and I'm looking forward to the second film.

      Keeper of the DKE glossary. Priceless: worth a lot; not for sale.

      by SaoMagnifico on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:45:18 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I miused the word "legendarium." (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SaoMagnifico, James Allen

        Tolkien's legendarium was The Simarillion, as it chronicles the epic struggle against Morgoth.  What I meant to say is that this adaptation of the Hobbit was one that had Tolkien's expanded universe in it, which he hadn't even scratched the surface of way back when he wrote it.  There was one very notable deviation from that, but I don't want to give any spoilers.

        And yes, The Hobbit was quite a bit lighter than the LOTR.  It was written for older kids for one thing.  That is summed up in a quote from the book where Gandalf says: "Jumping elephants, Bilbo, you're late!"

        Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

        by KingofSpades on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 08:58:54 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  The Great Goblin Scene was a dissappointment (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        KingofSpades, SaoMagnifico

        They could have cut some other stuff down a bit and given that an extended fight instead of Gandalf just slashing him. Overall, I enjoyed the film, but a lot of times it just kinda dragged on.

        I actually thought what they did with the troll sequence was pretty good, considering the silliness of the the source material. I actually wouldn't have blamed Jackson if he had cut it out entirely, but what he did with it was good.

        I liked they way the set Bolg up to be a more serious villain and had him be directly behind things that Tolkien didn't specify (like the post-mountains warg attack), but I think that the main main problem the movie suffered from was the fact that it can't decide whether it wants to be the quaint story Tolkien wrote in 1937 or a Jaksonian epic based on the broader Tolkien Mythos. Stuff like the 20 minute sequence of the dwarves singing and trolling Bilbo being in a movie full of epic flashbacks (let a lone the tail of re rediscovery and rise of Souron that they're actually including with the necromancer) felt a bit off.

        That being said, I absolutely loved Martin Freeman as Bilbo.

        •  I know it's minor, but I loved their take on the (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SaoMagnifico

          "That's what Bilbo Baggins hates" song with the dishes.

          And that orc leader was not Bolg, but Azog.  Unlike the source material, he wasn't beheaded by Dain in an earlier skirmish.  that's the big difference I spoke about.

          Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

          by KingofSpades on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 11:27:13 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I was slightly sad they didn't include (0+ / 0-)

            the orcs singing "15 birds in 5 fir trees" like in the book.

            Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

            by KingofSpades on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 11:29:34 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  I've read a lot of reviews... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            James Allen, KingofSpades

            Complaining about the "slow start". But I've seen Fellowship enough times to know that Frodo doesn't get his ass out of the Shire until almost an hour into the film.

            Keeper of the DKE glossary. Priceless: worth a lot; not for sale.

            by SaoMagnifico on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 01:10:13 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Interesting (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            KingofSpades

            I assumed that that was Bolg, since They did show Thorin seriously wounding him an I know that he dies earlier in the books, but I remember being somewhat confused as to why he looked JUST like his father.

            I assume this means they'll have Azog at the Battle of Five Armies, which should be interesting, since I know they cast someone as Bolg as well.

            •  Yeah, that was Azog (0+ / 0-)

              he has a prostethic metal arm now and now he's after Thorin as both to seek Ahabian revenge as well as to extinguish the line of Durin the Deathless.  Supposedly, Bolg will come in later (if I read the wiki right).

              Age 23. Voting in NJ-03. Lived most of life in NJ-01. Had Rush Holt represent me during my undergrad years and am now represented by Frank Pallone in my grad school.

              by KingofSpades on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 02:09:14 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  Apparently a lot of the differences from the (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades

      original book are actually from the appendicies of the LOTR. I never read the appendicies so I was supprised by some of the new stuff that I didn't remember being in the book. The new stuff really helps tie the whole story in with the LOTR though.

      22, Progressive Democrat, MN-08 (home), MN-05 (college)

      by JonathanMN on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 12:01:20 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Trivia question (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tietack, Zack from the SFV

    When was the last time a Republican represented a district that included Compton, CA in the state legislature?

    26, Male, CA-24 (new CA-26), DK Elections Black Caucus Chair.

    by DrPhillips on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 06:28:47 PM PST

  •  question about Orlando (Orange County) (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY

    does anyone know why the area was such a republican stronghold from about 1948 to 1996?

    RRH expat (known as AquarianLeft). Also known as freepcrusher on leip atlas forum

    by demographicarmageddon on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:17:32 PM PST

    •  probably retirees (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      thats the best assumption I could come up with.

      Moderate Progressive, Born in Cairo, Raised in NY-11, Living in NJ-13.

      by BKGyptian89 on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:50:18 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Republican strongholds in the (6+ / 0-)

      Deep South were in the metro areas back in the 40s/50s.

      20, CA-18 (home), CA-13 (school)
      politicohen.com
      Socially libertarian, moderate on foreign policy, immigration, and crime, liberal on everything else.
      UC Berkeley; I think I'm in the conservative half of this city. -.5.38, -3.23

      by jncca on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 10:58:11 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I was going through old (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades, MichaelNY

      Almanacs of American politics. In 1984, Orange County was split between the 5th (western Orange County and Seminole County, and part of Lake County) and 11th District (Eastern Orange County and Brevard, Osceola and Indian River Counties). The districts were 2% and 3% Hispanic and 12% and 6% Black. Reagan received 64% of the vote in both districts in 1980. By 1988, it was 68% and 70% for G.W. Bush.

      However, retirees were not a major reason for the growth. To quote the Almanac about the then 5th District: "The growth is all the more extraordinary, because very little of it can be attributed to retirees." Much of the growth was from families with children. This was before Disney actively pursued Hispanic labor for their theme pakrs. Also major factors in the Republicanism of the area was the presence of a lot of money into defense contracting industry and the real estate boom in the area.

      "So there's a time for silence, and there's a time for waiting your turn. But if you know how you feel, and you so clearly know what you need to say, you'll know it. I don't think you should wait. I think you should speak now." -Taylor Swift

      by SouthernINDem on Sat Dec 22, 2012 at 11:42:52 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Hawaii scenerio (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY

    since everybody is talking about seniority between the next 2 Senators from Hawaii. Wouldn't it jus be the logical thing for Akaka to resign, so he can give a leg up to Hirono who's gonna be sworn in late next week. Than Hanabusa can be sworn in like a day after?

    Moderate Progressive, Born in Cairo, Raised in NY-11, Living in NJ-13.

    by BKGyptian89 on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 07:16:51 AM PST

    •  It's part of the fiscal cliff / Jan 3 scenario (3+ / 0-)

      The assumption is that something big is afoot w/r/t the cliff and possible legislative changes (filibuster rules).

      I don't think any votes are going to happen on either issue before Jan 4. The markets aren't panicking. Businesses are assuming no changes in tax withholding (except for Social Security) through the end of January. The Senate doesn't have to have an organizing resolution on Jan 3 (someone correct me if I'm wrong on that one).

      aka, there's no rush.

      If that assumption holds, Hirono can be sworn in on Jan 3, Hanabusa (assuming she is asked and accepts the appointment) can be sworn in on Jan 4.

      I hope; therefore, I can live.

      by tietack on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 07:55:19 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I read on TPM yesterday (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SaoMagnifico, jj32, MichaelNY, askew

        that Reid is asking Abercrombie to make his appointment for Inouye's seat with haste -- i.e. before the end of the year.

        •  Yeah, I dont know if going over the cliff is (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY, itskevin

          a sure thing at this point. But I certainly wouldnt be surprised if it happened. I mean, just looking at the calendar, it seems like it would be difficult for both houses to vote on a plan and get it to the president's desk by Jan 1st. Assuming of course, they agree on a plan to begin with.

          But who knows what is happening behind the scenes. I think Obama, Reid, and McConnell will all be in HI today for Inouye's funeral. At the very least the Senate might pass something by the end of the year.

          •  I think the real "fiscal cliff" date is afte Jan 1 (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY, Zack from the SFV

            given http://articles.chicagotribune.com/...

            Some payroll servicers are not waiting for formal IRS guidance. The American Payroll Association, which represents about 23,000 payroll professionals, told members on Friday to rely on 2012 withholding tables until the IRS releases the new forms for 2013.
            Which suggests the real "fiscal cliff" date is whatever date is needed to set up a new withholding table for February of 2013.

            I hope; therefore, I can live.

            by tietack on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 11:21:26 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Right (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MichaelNY, tietack

              in reality, I dont think there is a huge economic consequences for going over the cliff for a little while, especially if the word is lawmakers are working on a deal.

              Just wondering what Reid's thinking is on the timing of any potential deal. Reid said he wanted an HI appointment by the end of the month.

    •  I think that's a plausible scenario (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      I can see the seniority issue being a major sticking point between the two senators, since by all accounts, they don't particularly like one another.

      Keeper of the DKE glossary. Priceless: worth a lot; not for sale.

      by SaoMagnifico on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 10:07:32 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I think the senate poopooed that kind of thing (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, James Allen

      I remember that Cornyn was denied increased seniority in 2000 when he was sworn in early. And in 2002, Jesse Ventura swore to appoint the winner of the general election to the senate seat early, but upon being told that it wouldn't affect seniority, he appointed an interim senator Dean Barkley instead of the winner of the election, Norm Coleman.

      Also, due to the fact that Hirono has seniority in the House anyways, she would be put in queue ahead of Hanabusa when they are both sworn in next week.

  •  Another potential HI-01 candidate? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY

    Donna Mercado Kim and Will Espero have entered their names for consideration to be appointed to Daniel Inouye's seat. Mercado Kim's SD-14 and Espero's SD-19 are located squarely within HI-01. As Rep. Hanabusa is very likely to be the appointee, I see their interest as a means of raising their respective profiles ahead of a bid for Hanabusa's seat if and when it becomes vacant. Story here.

    There's also a comment from Brickwood Galuteria, another potential HI-01 candidate, on the process:

    Hanabusa was hand picked by Inouye to succeed him but one former chairman of the Democratic Party says her nomination is not a sure thing.

    "It's not a done deal. I think the Senator will probably appreciate the process, you know, because he's a good Democrat," said state Sen. Brickwood Galuteria, (D) Ala Moana, Waikiki.

    "The law calls for us to pick three to be forwarded to the governor for consideration and he is the decision maker."

    Hard to read much into that, but he's not publicly salivating over a House vacancy in the congressional district where he lives.

    Keeper of the DKE glossary. Priceless: worth a lot; not for sale.

    by SaoMagnifico on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 10:23:43 AM PST

    •  Here's some more info on Espero (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Allen, MichaelNY

      He has apparently been eyeing a Senate seat for a long time. Not sure why he didn't run this year. Story here.

      HIS dream is to be the first American of Filipino ancestry in the US Senate. Hawaii State Senator William Espero (D-HI) is certainly on his way toward that dream.

      Espero is currently serving a second term as a Hawaii state senator. He was first elected to the senate in 2002. Prior to that, Governor Ben Cayetano appointed Espero to the House as the 41st representative district of Ewa Beach.

      There's also this:
      He lost his first run at a Hawaii senate seat in 1992. He ran as a Republican but switched to the Democratic Party two years after the lost.
      Hm.

      Keeper of the DKE glossary. Priceless: worth a lot; not for sale.

      by SaoMagnifico on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 10:26:44 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  And here's more (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      Rep.-elect Gabbard doesn't sound interested, or at least she's doing a good job of sounding shocked and appalled by the very notion of discussing it. Story here.

      "It really is unthinkable for me, right now, to even talk about that, as we've just watched the beautiful service in the National Cathedral for him and as we bring him home to put him to rest," Gabbard said in an interview Friday. "I know myself along with so many other people are mourning the loss that we all share, and that's where I'm at.

      "Like many others I'm taking this moment to grieve for him and for all of Hawaii."

      And then we have a couple more names, which could, again, be seen as HI-01 trial balloons:
      Meanwhile, former state Rep. Blake Oshiro, an aide to Gov. Neil Abercrombie, confirmed he has applied for the vacancy, and state Sen. Donna Mercado Kim (D, Kalihi Valley-Moanalua-Halawa) announced her intent to apply. Kim is vice president of the state Senate and serves as chairwoman of the Senate Special Committee on Accountability, which most recently investigated the University of Hawaii's handling of a bogus Stevie Wonder concert.

      Former Office of Hawaiian Affairs chief advocate Esther Kiaaina, who unsuccessfully ran in the Democratic primary for the 2nd Congressional District, also applied, a source said.

      Others who have applied or announced their intent to apply for the vacancy include U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, Lt. Gov. Brian Schatz, state Sen. Will Espero and Tony Gill, chairman of the Oahu Democrats.

      Oshiro is Abercrombie's deputy chief of staff and is openly gay. He mauled a credible conservative primary challenger in 2010 by a 12-point margin. One wrinkle is that he lives just outside urban Honolulu; I believe he's either just outside HI-01 or on the fringe of it. Not that residency is a huge issue in Hawaii...

      Keeper of the DKE glossary. Priceless: worth a lot; not for sale.

      by SaoMagnifico on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 10:32:26 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Boston Globe has a good story about (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike, KingofSpades

    the inner workings of the Romney campaign.

    Assuming you arent tired of 2012 presidential analysis already.
    :)

  •  Gr-leg (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY, MetroGnome

    A BBC documentary uncovered new evidence linking Golden Dawn to the attempted murder of SYRIZA MP Dimitris Stratoulis: Link

    Golden Dawn was previously suing Stratoulis for defamation when he blamed the attack on Golden Dawn and said they were a party of criminals. BBC infiltrated a XA party meeting and recorded Golden Dawn deputy John Hare talking about the attack:

    Here's BBC's transcript of what he said:

    "First of all, I want to express my displeasure about some of the newer members of Golden Dawn, who are all about shouting and being provocative. Three of them were beating up that poor fellow for half an hour and didn’t even succeed in leaving a lump on his head. That’s shameful." [laughter from other members]

    (-9.38, -7.49), Blood type "O", social anarchist, KY-01, "When smashing monuments, save the pedestals. They always come in handy." — Stanisław Lem

    by Setsuna Mudo on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 10:43:50 AM PST

    •  How kind of them (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      Is there a provision in Greece to deny a party ballot access? I know there is such a provision in Germany.

      •  The Supreme Court has to grant ballot access (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY

        However, I don't know what the provisions are to deny a party ballot access. I know, for example, that Monarchist parties are banned, and that parties who's names are profane or which promote violence are banned.

        I don't know if a party could be denied ballot access for the actions of its members, or how easy it would be to prove, or enforce, any potential ideological provisions.

        (-9.38, -7.49), Blood type "O", social anarchist, KY-01, "When smashing monuments, save the pedestals. They always come in handy." — Stanisław Lem

        by Setsuna Mudo on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 04:38:27 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  MN Legislature: More when I'm (6+ / 0-)

    on another computer, but let's see.

    Going off of Secretary of State figures for the legislature and also for Amendment 1, there are 29 Democratic seats that voted against the Amendment.  8 Republican seats voted against the Amendment, with the following percentages for "no", and the following Republican Senators:

    District    14    53.86%     JOHN PEDERSON
    District    33    54.60%     DAVID OSMEK
    District    34    52.88%     WARREN LIMMER
    District    38    52.57%     ROGER CHAMBERLAIN
    District    39    53.51%     KARIN HOUSLEY
    District    48    60.32%     DAVID HANN
    District    55    51.06%     ERIC PRATT
    District    56    54.18%     DAN HALL
    10 Democratic seats voted for the amendment, giving "no" the following percentages:
    District    1    32.23%     LEROY STUMPF
    District    2    36.04%     ROD SKOE
    District    4    46.22%     KENT EKEN
    District    5    44.76%     TOM SAXHAUG
    District    6    46.80%     DAVID J. TOMASSONI
    District    11    42.15%     TONY LOUREY
    District    17    35.69%     LYLE KOENEN
    District    21    44.50%     MATT SCHMIT
    District    24    43.23%     VICKI JENSEN
    District    27    40.53%     DAN SPARKS
    Finally, 20 Republican seats backed the amendment.  (That works out to 28 Republican seats to 39 Democratic seats.)

    In the House, 55 seats voted for Democrats and against Amendment 1.  21 Republican seats voted against Amendment 1, giving "no" the following percentages:

    Legislative District 14A             50.66%    STEVE GOTTWALT
    Legislative District 33A             50.64%    JERRY HERTAUS
    Legislative District 33B             58.55%    CINDY PUGH
    Legislative District 34A             50.92%    JOYCE PEPPIN
    Legislative District 34B             54.75%    KURT ZELLERS
    Legislative District 36A             51.91%    MARK UGLEM
    Legislative District 37B             50.89%    TIM SANDERS
    Legislative District 38A             50.75%    LINDA RUNBECK
    Legislative District 38B             54.21%    MATT DEAN
    Legislative District 39A             51.54%    BOB DETTMER
    Legislative District 39B             55.49%    KATHY LOHMER
    Legislative District 44A             59.02%    SARAH ANDERSON
    Legislative District 47B             54.19%    JOE HOPPE
    Legislative District 48B             59.15%    JENIFER LOON
    Legislative District 53B             56.39%    ANDREA KIEFFER
    Legislative District 54B             52.14%    DENNY MCNAMARA
    Legislative District 55A             52.83%    MIKE BEARD
    Legislative District 56A             54.22%    PAM MYHRA
    Legislative District 57A             54.77%    TARA MACK
    Legislative District 57B             55.48%    ANNA WILLS
    Legislative District 58A             50.87%    MARY LIZ HOLBERG
    18 Democratic seats backed Amendment 1, giving "no" the following percentages:
    Legislative District 2A             39.42%    ROGER A ERICKSON
    Legislative District 3A             48.50%    DAVID DILL
    Legislative District 4B             39.43%    PAUL MARQUART
    Legislative District 5A             47.74%    JOHN PERSELL
    Legislative District 5B             41.95%    TOM ANZELC
    Legislative District 6A             46.87%    CARLY MELIN
    Legislative District 6B             46.72%    JASON METSA
    Legislative District 10A             41.87%    JOHN WARD
    Legislative District 10B             36.73%    JOE RADINOVICH
    Legislative District 11A             47.55%    MIKE SUNDIN
    Legislative District 11B             36.28%    TIM FAUST
    Legislative District 12A             35.44%    JAY MCNAMAR
    Legislative District 17A             33.56%    ANDREW FALK
    Legislative District 17B             37.85%    MARY SAWATZKY
    Legislative District 24B             41.52%    PATTI FRITZ
    Legislative District 27A             39.17%    SHANNON SAVICK
    Legislative District 27B             42.06%    JEANNE POPPE
    Legislative District 40A             49.13%    MICHAEL NELSON
    Finally, 40 Republican seats backed Amendment 1.  I'd do a scatterplot, but I'm on a public library computer, that doesn't have every conceivable program already downloaded onto it.  

    So, what are your thoughts?  It seems to me that the Amendment lost both chambers, and the Republicans lost both chambers, but the interplay between those facts might be tricky.

    27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

    by Xenocrypt on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 11:38:06 AM PST

    •  Looking at the (0+ / 0-)

      district maps: with the exception of District 14A, all the Republican/"No" House seats would seem to be in the Twin Cities metro area.  District 14A is Saint Cloud.  The same for the Senate, with District 14 again the exception.  And of course, the Democratic Senate seats backing the Amendment are all "outstate" to my eye (who was it who called NC's Amendment a "town and country" result?).

      However, Democratic "outstate" seats 3, 19, and 20 all opposed Amendment 1.  The Amendment only failed in District 3 because of how it did in the Duluth inner ring District 3B, since the Amendment passed the more rural District 3A, although only relatively narrowly, as you see above.  I don't know what's up with District 20.

      27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

      by Xenocrypt on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 12:00:42 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  In District 20, the Amendment (0+ / 0-)

      passed District 20A (a Republican seat) but failed in District 20B (a Democratic seat), and I suppose the combination was strong enough.  (Districts 3 and 20 had the smallest Amendment 1 defeats of any Democratic Senate seats.)

      Looking at the precinct results, it's pretty apparent that Amendment 1 lost 20B because of the city of Northfield, which only has 20,000 people, but I guess that's enough.  Similarly, the Amendment did badly in District 19 because of Mankato.

      The following Republican Senate seats only passed the Amendment relatively narrowly:

      District    58    49.45%     DAVE THOMPSON
      District    28    48.50%     JEREMY MILLER
      District    47    48.05%     JULIANNE ORTMAN
      District    35    47.55%     BRANDEN PETERSEN
      District    13    45.62%     MICHELLE FISCHBACH
      District    30    45.55%     MARY KIFFMEYER

      27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

      by Xenocrypt on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 12:09:28 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  This is what I had suspected (0+ / 0-)

      Although I had not compiled the data in your fashion. Thank you for doing this in this manner.

  •  Apparently, Romney didn't want to be President (14+ / 0-)

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

    Tagg Romney said his father "wanted to be president less than anyone I've met in my life," according to the Boston Globe.

    “He had no desire,” the eldest Romney son said. “If he could have found someone else to take his place ... he would have been ecstatic to step aside. He is a very private person who loves his family deeply and wants to be with them, but he has deep faith in God and he loves his country, but he doesn’t love the attention."

    Somehow, I don't believe he really didn't want the Presidency.

    26, Male, CA-24 (new CA-26), DK Elections Black Caucus Chair.

    by DrPhillips on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 11:39:42 AM PST

  •  North Carolina congressional vote by county (6+ / 0-)

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    Overall, Dems won the house popular vote in North Carolina 50.93% to 49.07% (two party share), running ahead of Obama by 1.97% statewide (two party share).  1 county, Pitt, voted Obama/Republican while 12 counties, Columbus, Duplin, Greene, Haywood, Jackson, Lenoir, McDowell, Montgomery, New Hanover, Sampson, Swain, and Watauga, voted Romney/Democratic.

    Photobucket

    And by congressional district:
    Photobucket

    NC-06/NC-04; -9.12, -8.62; Yellow Dog Democrat

    by sawolf on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 12:05:38 PM PST

  •  Looking at the precinct map, I saw (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades, CF of Aus, tietack

    some strongly pro-Amendment-1 precincts in Minneapolis.  Here's "no" on the Amendment by Ward:

    W-01    24.36%
    W-02    16.27%
    W-03    17.96%
    W-04    35.90%
    W-05    40.53%
    W-06    49.20%
    W-07    14.21%
    W-08    18.77%
    W-09    25.71%
    W-10    12.96%
    W-11    21.15%
    W-12    21.27%
    W-13    14.80%
    Yep: Amendment 1 nearly passed a ward in Minneapolis.  In fact, of the 6 precincts in Minneapolis that backed the Amendment, 4 were in Ward 6.  You can see updated ward maps here.  It sounds like the process of drawing the ward was contentious.  Here's another article:
    Redistricting officials had sought to redraw the Sixth Ward, which currently spans Whittier, Phillips West, Ventura Village and Stevens Square/Loring Heights, to give East African immigrants a better election opportunity.

    But the effort was controversial.

    Latinos from the Ninth Ward wanted to keep all of Midtown Phillips. And Indians complained that the changes to accommodate East Africans were dividing them, especially given that the larger East African group is motivated to put one of their own on the council. Council Member Robert Lilligren, who is an Indian, currently represents the Sixth Ward.

    "We have absolutely nothing against the Somali people or black people; we just don't like you to put us together ... and turn us against each other," said Clyde Bellecourt, executive director of the American Indian Movement Interpretive Center.

    He said they would not wait around for another 10 years -- when the next redistricting will occur -- for "a bunch of pale faces" to make decisions. When Clegg interjected that Bellecourt's time was up, he retorted, "My time is never up. Your time is up." The audience applauded.

    [...]
    Several hours in, the group voted 14-8 to make further changes to the map after some said they were rushing a vote and not listening to the community. The version that will be voted on Tuesday by the Charter Commission will now keep all of Midtown Phillips in the Ninth Ward.

    But to maintain enough population in the adjacent Sixth, redistricting officials pushed an additional half-dozen blocks of Seward into the Sixth, pulled in Loring Heights and more of Cedar-Riverside and pushed Stevens Square out to the Seventh.

    Those changes are sure to invite opposition from some Somali-Americans, and several redistricting members said the panel was doing that group a disservice.

    I can't really follow all that, not being familiar with the city, but it sounds like an interesting story.

    27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

    by Xenocrypt on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 12:43:44 PM PST

    •  Note that (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, tietack

      (since it's inevitable to wonder about the correlation between ethnicity and voting on these things, alas) Ward 6 is actually whiter than Ward 5 (which apparently has a majority-black 18+ population).  Ward 9 is the other non-majority-white district by 18+ population, and maybe Ward 4, if they accounted for Hispanic populations.  Those are the four best wards Amendment 1 had in Minneapolis, but I don't think this is so clear-cut as that.

      27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14).

      by Xenocrypt on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 01:09:24 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ward 5 (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY

        This is the impoverished areas of North Minneapolis. The census counts black as black, but the black voters in North Minneapolis are much more similar to the ones you find in places like Detroit than the black Somali Muslims in ward 6.

    •  That district is heavily Muslim (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, SaoMagnifico

      It doesn't surprise me at all that this is the most socially conservative area in the city.

  •  My Races (14+ / 0-)

    Let me start by introducing myself candidly, as if at an AA meeting: Hi, I'm betelgeux, I'm a political junkie and proud progressive from CT, and this is my first comment on Daily Kos. I've been a long-time lurker and I'm looking forward to networking with fellow election junkies and progressives.

    Anyway, here are some races I'm interested in:

    MA-Sen (of course)--Honestly, Markey isn't my personal favorite for the Special Election. He's done excellent work in the House, and I'd like to see him stay there. When the Dems get the majority back (probably not in '14, but I'm optomistic for '16) I think he'll do some great work as a committee chairman, just as he did last congress. If he moves to the Senate now, he'll lose his seniority, which I think is key to his effectiveness as a progressive leader.
    My personal pick is Rep. Jim McGovern. Although "he has less charisma than a sea sponge" as one commenter here put it, he is a hardworking progressive who deserves a promotion. He might want to stay in the House, though, since he's poised to be chairman of the Rules Committee if the Dems win back the majority. Rep. Mike Capuano is also excellent, and I like his blue collar, middle class persona. It's much more authentic than Brown's, which could serve him well if he's pitted against Brown in the Special.

    HI-Sen/HI-01--Colleen Hanabusa would make an excellent Senator, as Inouye realized. It seems almost certain that Gov. Abercrombie will appoint her, which is good news, considering that she is a great advocate for the middle class in Congress. Of course, that leaves her House seat open, which would need to be filled with a Special Election. I've heard former Honolulu Mayor Mufi Hanneman is being floated as a possible candidate, but apparently he's pretty socially conservative. And didn't he just run and lose against Gabbard in HI-02? If he keeps moving around like that, he'll face allegations of carpetbagging. Who else could run besides Hanneman? (Please, don't mention awful Ed Case!) I was thinking Lt. Gov. Brian Schatz, but I'm not sure if he lives in HI-01. The GOP may field moderate Charles Djou (who won in the last Special Election for HI-01, but lost in his bid for a full term) or 2010 Gubernatorial candidate James Aiona (again, I'm not sure where he lives).

    Student, Proud Progressive, Science Nerd, and Skeptic. Born and raised in CT-03.

    by betelgeux on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 01:31:28 PM PST

  •  why does politico suck so bad? (14+ / 0-)

    Yes, politico, I am dying to read a media story about how the media feels about doing its fucking job.

    And even though the fiscal cliff is preoccupying Washington, that doesn’t mean it is always engaging for the media. Important, sure, but is it really that interesting to talk about day in, day out?
    Poor, poor, idiot journalists, having to cover a serious topic that requires actually thinking about stuff. I feel so bad that they can't cover something that is "interesting to talk about day in, day out."
    “Further, there’s nothing the media hates more than a story it must cover that’s moving at a glacial pace.
    And the slowness! The only thing smaller than their brains is their attention spans. The suffering must be unimaginable.
    “I do think it’s important because it touches on some important topics. Anti-tax absolutism on the GOP side has been an impediment to sound fiscal policy for two decades here. It won’t solve everything if the GOP gives in now, but it would be a start,” he said. “Plus, there are potentially major changes to Medicare and Social Security that Obama now may be flirting with — if he gives in on, say, the Medicare eligibility age, that’s huge.”
    Thanks for the reminder that the fiscal cliff is important! Since it's only another recession and people's lives and livelihoods at stake, it's hard to remember sometimes.
  •  KS St. House (5+ / 0-)

    why is the Secret Service not investigating the speaker of the Kansas House? http://thinkprogress.org/...

    Living in Kyoto-06 (Japan), voting in RI-01, went to college in IL-01.

    by sapelcovits on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 05:21:15 PM PST

  •  Sen. Crapo arrested in Va for DUI (9+ / 0-)

    If you drink, stay off the road folks.  

    The NRA is the Gun Manufacturer Lobby. Nothing more. Their pontification about the second amendment is nothing more than their ad jingle. They're the domestic version of the Military Industrial Complex.

    by Jacoby Jonze on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 05:34:54 PM PST

  •  R.I.P. Bill McBride (20+ / 0-)

    The Democratic candidate for FL-GOV in 2002. Condolences to his wife, Alex Sink (the 2010 D candidate for FL-GOV) and his family.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/...

  •  My wish for a new PPP poll next year (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sawolf, MichaelNY, James Allen

    is West Virginia. Can see new Senate numbers testing Moore Capito and McKinley vs. Rockefeller, as well as other possible Dems if Rockefeller retires. Also, 2016 Presidential numbers to see if the Hillary strength shown in Kentucky also appears in its neighbor West Virginia. My other two choices would be Arkansas, testing 2016, Senate race matchups, and what the scandal has done to AG McDaniel, and numbers in Florida (for obvious reasons). And if I could have another two, South Dakota and Montana.

    "So there's a time for silence, and there's a time for waiting your turn. But if you know how you feel, and you so clearly know what you need to say, you'll know it. I don't think you should wait. I think you should speak now." -Taylor Swift

    by SouthernINDem on Sun Dec 23, 2012 at 09:18:05 PM PST

    •  You're being greedy this christmas :-) (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      (-9.38, -7.49), Blood type "O", social anarchist, KY-01, "When smashing monuments, save the pedestals. They always come in handy." — Stanisław Lem

      by Setsuna Mudo on Mon Dec 24, 2012 at 05:18:51 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

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